biologicalmarginalia:

thelonelywhale:

As a paleo-artist, one of my biggest pet peeves are prehistoric whales reconstructed not as whales but as sinewy, snarling, shrink-wrapped marine reptiles. It’s just not a plausible reconstruction, even if it’s highly speculative, and it paints an incorrect image in the public eye. Granted, this is a struggle I’ve exlpored in all forms of paleo-art and reconstructive illustration. But the whales have really been getting to me recently.
Here are some recontructions of Basilosaurus, if you don’t know what I mean (one by Karen Carr, the other by an artist I could not determine):


These snakey, reptilious reconstructions may stem from the fact that Basilosaurus, one of the first early cetaceans to be found, was believed to be a reptile when first discovered (hence the name). Maybe we simply haven’t fully shaken that mindset.
But still! Even the damn Smithsonian, which has such a wonderful collection of ancient cetaceans, is at fault in this:

Don’t even get me started on their recently-closed dinosaur hall. Thank the lord they’re finally renovating that dated piece of crap.
I have struggled to find a way to reconstruct these animals so that they are just a little bit more believeable. Up top I’ve done a really really quick sketch of Dorudon. I tried to not only make its body more streamlined and whale-like (because Dorudon has a lovely, almost but not quite modern-looking skeleton), but I also tried to give it markings similar to what we find on modern cetaceans for camouflage. Because hey, who’s to say they didn’t have ‘em? I tried to make them familiar but not directly copied from any modern species.
Aaaaand end rant.

This is fantastic!
It will never cease to amaze me how some artists reconstruct extinct whales as mosasaur-like monsters instead of… whales. There is a hideous fucking Dorudon on the cover of Uhen (2004), a 222 page treatise that clearly states that in life, the cetacean was certainly blubbery and streamlined.

yes!!!!!

biologicalmarginalia:

thelonelywhale:

As a paleo-artist, one of my biggest pet peeves are prehistoric whales reconstructed not as whales but as sinewy, snarling, shrink-wrapped marine reptiles. It’s just not a plausible reconstruction, even if it’s highly speculative, and it paints an incorrect image in the public eye. Granted, this is a struggle I’ve exlpored in all forms of paleo-art and reconstructive illustration. But the whales have really been getting to me recently.

Here are some recontructions of Basilosaurus, if you don’t know what I mean (one by Karen Carr, the other by an artist I could not determine):

These snakey, reptilious reconstructions may stem from the fact that Basilosaurus, one of the first early cetaceans to be found, was believed to be a reptile when first discovered (hence the name). Maybe we simply haven’t fully shaken that mindset.

But still! Even the damn Smithsonian, which has such a wonderful collection of ancient cetaceans, is at fault in this:

Don’t even get me started on their recently-closed dinosaur hall. Thank the lord they’re finally renovating that dated piece of crap.

I have struggled to find a way to reconstruct these animals so that they are just a little bit more believeable. Up top I’ve done a really really quick sketch of Dorudon. I tried to not only make its body more streamlined and whale-like (because Dorudon has a lovely, almost but not quite modern-looking skeleton), but I also tried to give it markings similar to what we find on modern cetaceans for camouflage. Because hey, who’s to say they didn’t have ‘em? I tried to make them familiar but not directly copied from any modern species.

Aaaaand end rant.

This is fantastic!

It will never cease to amaze me how some artists reconstruct extinct whales as mosasaur-like monsters instead of… whales. There is a hideous fucking Dorudon on the cover of Uhen (2004), a 222 page treatise that clearly states that in life, the cetacean was certainly blubbery and streamlined.

yes!!!!!

infinitemachine:

Dinosaur of the Day: Plateosaurus by Apsaravis
Plateosaurus Family: Plateosauridae Time: Late Triassic Location: Central and Northern Europe Size (length): 4.8 and 10m (16-33ft)


this is absolutely beautiful!

infinitemachine:

Dinosaur of the Day: Plateosaurus by Apsaravis

Plateosaurus
Family: Plateosauridae
Time: Late Triassic
Location: Central and Northern Europe
Size (length): 4.8 and 10m (16-33ft)

this is absolutely beautiful!

antediluvianechoes:

Kentrosaurus Drinking from a Late Jurassic African Forest River, James Field
The river was slow enough to let the mist hang on it in the morning, but strong enough to not be silent. Its voice was constant but gentle, burbling songs that rolled over rocks and around the branches of a fallen tree. Kentrosaurus drank sloppily, letting the cold water spill from its beak—pouring like the stream from a watering can—and spatter back into the river. The dinosaur shivered a little, plates and spines clattering—tremors moved like waves across its dappled hide. When its thirst was slaked, Kentrosaurus ambled back into the forest, and the river spoke only to itself.

antediluvianechoes:

Kentrosaurus Drinking from a Late Jurassic African Forest River, James Field

The river was slow enough to let the mist hang on it in the morning, but strong enough to not be silent. Its voice was constant but gentle, burbling songs that rolled over rocks and around the branches of a fallen tree. Kentrosaurus drank sloppily, letting the cold water spill from its beak—pouring like the stream from a watering can—and spatter back into the river. The dinosaur shivered a little, plates and spines clattering—tremors moved like waves across its dappled hide. When its thirst was slaked, Kentrosaurus ambled back into the forest, and the river spoke only to itself.

danger-du-mont:

idiots

that was a ride from start to finish

danger-du-mont:

idiots

that was a ride from start to finish

moonwalking naked ornithomimus
Anonymous

that’s me

danger-du-mont:

flowergoose:

pen………..

so vicious

haha! she’s trying to have a bath in it

flowergoose:

pen………..

i was going to send you an ask about Dreadnaughtus earlier to see if you had seen he had been published but then i got super nervous and then you reblogged that post and now i feel better! such a wicked name for such a wicked dinosaur eh?

aw!! you didn’t have to be nervous :> it’s so cool! It might be my favourite dinosaur name now, if only for meaning alone

crownedrose:

Today is so exciting for a ton of fellow palaeontologists, students, researchers, and myself… Dreadnoughtus has finally been published!

The video above gives you guys a bit of history to where this titanosaur was discovered back in 2005. Almost ten years later and it’s finally gone public! With a name like Dreadnoughtus, it’s hard not to want to run around saying its awesome name.

These fossils spent a lot of time being excavated out of the matrix they were found in; around 4 years with multiple labs working tirelessly to clean and repair them. We had to get it done at least in some sort of quick time, right? With such a huge specimen, a lot of man power is required!

I’m so proud and happy for everyone involved that we can now share this gorgeous dinosaur to the public! It’s MASSIVE. The fossils are just mind blowing to look at, and now we continue to move forward with its preservation, education, and further research. It’ll be going back to Argentina next year.

You can read the article about Dreadnoughtus here on Drexel University’s website, and the scientific paper on Nature.com (which some super awesome people I know worked on).

i love all of you ah wow