Have I asked you how old Pen is? And how high can she jump? Can she flap up to your head and perch in your hair?

hehe she issss about 14 weeks I think? I’ll have to check but she’s nearly an adult, she just has to lose some fuzzy feathers on the top of her head and get her little horn casque thing and start laying eggs ahah…. she can jump/flap pretty high! she got on the roof of the conservatory yesterday. and yup hahahaha she’s a turd

skeletaldrawing:

Majungasaurus doesn’t need any special treatment to look bizarre, but in the post-snarl calm you can just sit and gaze at how strange this beast really was.

skeletaldrawing:

Majungasaurus doesn’t need any special treatment to look bizarre, but in the post-snarl calm you can just sit and gaze at how strange this beast really was.

pterosauria:

Rhamphorhynchus by Gareth Monger (Deviantart | Facebook)
smilodon I was half way through on the train a couple of weeks ago

smilodon I was half way through on the train a couple of weeks ago

rhamphotheca:

Flock of Ancient ‘Butterfly-Headed’ Flying Reptiles Discovered

by Tia Ghose

An ancient flying reptile with a bizarre, butterflylike head has been unearthed in Brazil.

The new-found pterosaur species, Caiuajara dobruskii, lived about 80 million years ago in an ancient desert oasis. The beast sported a strange bony crest on its head that looked like the wings of a butterfly, and had the wingspan needed to take flight at a very young age.

Hundreds of fossils from the reptile were unearthed in a single bone bed, providing the strongest evidence yet that the flying reptiles were social animals, said study co-author Alexander Kellner, a paleontologist at the Museu Nacional/Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro in Brazil…

(read more: Live Science)

illustration by Maurilio Oliveira/Museu Nacional-UFR; photos: Manzig et al, PLOS ONE 2014

strangebiology:

Paleontologists found this sweet whorl of teeth called a Helicoprion, but really didn’t know how it might have been situated in a fish’s mouth. 

There were many theories postulated about how the teeth fit in the animal’s mouth (fourth image). When another specimen was found, it was determined that the owner of this strange jaw (not a shark, but a ratfish) had no upper teeth at all.

Ladies and gentlemen, the most metal fish.

(via Laelaps/National Geographic) Art by Ray Troll.

prehistoric-birds:

A (Hopefully) Definitive Deinonych by pilsator
rhamphotheca:

Hallucigenia:  Worm-like creature with legs and spikes finds its place in the evolutionary tree of life
via: University of Cambridge
One of the most bizarre-looking fossils ever found - a worm-like creature with legs, spikes and a head difficult to distinguish from its tail – has found its place in the evolutionary Tree of Life, definitively linking it with a group of modern animals for the first time.
The animal, known as Hallucigenia due to its otherworldly appearance, had been considered an ‘evolutionary misfit’ as it was not clear how it related to modern animal groups. Researchers from the University of Cambridge have discovered an important link with modern velvet worms, also known as onychophorans, a relatively small group of worm-like animals that live in tropical forests. The results are published in the advance online edition of the journal Nature.
The affinity of Hallucigenia and other contemporary ‘legged worms’, collectively known as lobopodians, has been very controversial, as a lack of clear characteristics linking them to each other or to modern animals has made it difficult to determine their evolutionary home…
(read more: PhysOrg)
illustration by Elyssa Rider

rhamphotheca:

Hallucigenia:  Worm-like creature with legs and spikes finds its place in the evolutionary tree of life

via: University of Cambridge

One of the most bizarre-looking fossils ever found - a worm-like creature with legs, spikes and a head difficult to distinguish from its tail – has found its place in the evolutionary Tree of Life, definitively linking it with a group of modern animals for the first time.

The animal, known as Hallucigenia due to its otherworldly appearance, had been considered an ‘evolutionary misfit’ as it was not clear how it related to modern animal groups. Researchers from the University of Cambridge have discovered an important link with modern velvet worms, also known as onychophorans, a relatively small group of worm-like animals that live in tropical forests. The results are published in the advance online edition of the journal Nature.

The affinity of Hallucigenia and other contemporary ‘legged worms’, collectively known as lobopodians, has been very controversial, as a lack of clear characteristics linking them to each other or to modern animals has made it difficult to determine their evolutionary home…

(read more: PhysOrg)

illustration by Elyssa Rider

trying to work Aurornis out for a painting I’ll do later…..

trying to work Aurornis out for a painting I’ll do later…..

jurassiraptor:

lythronax-argestes-the-gore-king:

raptorcivilization:

lythronax-argestes-the-gore-king:

jurassiraptor:

First look at Jurassic World’s T. rex at Comic Con 2014
Via comingsoon.net

<sigh> hasn’t changed much, eh?
raptorcivilization, anything of note here in terms of palaeofails?
(Discounting feathers)

It’s got great big jowls that are not known from any tyrannosauroid (or indeed, any ornithodiran) and angry eyebrow ridges that are not known from any tyrannosaurine. Its skull looks small compared to the neck and its snout looks too short. And I can’t see its nostrils.

Nor can I. This is an all-around abomination that is nevertheless true to the original JP

Just an update on this, it turns out it is likely NOT related to Jurassic World specifically, but it is a decorative piece by Profiles in History, based on the first Jurassic Park, which is for sale at the convention. (For the low, low price of $12,000 it can be yours!) The T. rex in Jurassic World may or may not look like this.

look at those goddamn eyeballs

jurassiraptor:

lythronax-argestes-the-gore-king:

raptorcivilization:

lythronax-argestes-the-gore-king:

jurassiraptor:

First look at Jurassic World’s T. rex at Comic Con 2014

Via comingsoon.net

<sigh> hasn’t changed much, eh?

raptorcivilization, anything of note here in terms of palaeofails?

(Discounting feathers)

It’s got great big jowls that are not known from any tyrannosauroid (or indeed, any ornithodiran) and angry eyebrow ridges that are not known from any tyrannosaurine. Its skull looks small compared to the neck and its snout looks too short. And I can’t see its nostrils.

Nor can I. This is an all-around abomination that is nevertheless true to the original JP

Just an update on this, it turns out it is likely NOT related to Jurassic World specifically, but it is a decorative piece by Profiles in History, based on the first Jurassic Park, which is for sale at the convention. (For the low, low price of $12,000 it can be yours!) 

The T. rex in Jurassic World may or may not look like this.

look at those goddamn eyeballs